Alberta Barley

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Identification and development of barley germplasm and varieties with resistance to multiple diseases

Project lead:
Dr. T. Kelly Turkington
Research Scientist
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Timeline: April 2013 – March 2018

Partners:
AAFC-BMBRI-WGRF
Alberta Barley funding: $51,636
Total funding from other partners: $344,393

Benefits for farmers
The project will provide barley farmers with the technology and ability to manage risk in the form of leaf, root and head diseases and their negative impact on yield and quality, as well as improve acceptability for malt status or as quality feed. This will mean increased profits, while ensuring a more consistent supply of high-quality malting, feed and silage barley for domestic and international markets. In the long term, disease resistance reduces reliance on agrichemicals, which benefits the environment and helps to maintain a healthy and nutritious food supply, while decreasing production costs for farmers.

Disease resistance doesn’t represent a significant added cost for producers, is environmentally friendly and very easy for producers to incorporate into their disease and crop management programs.

Summary
The project aims to identify barley germplasm, breeding lines and varieties with resistance to a range of foliar, root and head diseases. Identification of resistance will be essential to facilitate the development of adapted germplasm, breeding lines and varieties with resistance to multiple diseases.

Recent developments
In 2015, sources of resistance to scald, both forms of net blotch, and stripe rust of barley for western Canadian barley breeding programs were identified as part of ongoing disease screening nurseries evaluating breeding lines and germplasm.  Also, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry breeding lines and germplasm were inoculated and screened for resistance to loose smut, and covered smut.  Assessment of advanced lines and entries in the cooperative and advanced tests from various breeding programs were also conducted for reaction to common root rot and identification and elimination of those lines that are very susceptible.

Main objectives for the upcoming year
To identify barley germplasm, breeding lines and varieties with resistance to a range of foliar and head diseases.  Identification of resistance will be essential to facilitate the development of adapted germplasm, breeding lines and varieties with resistance to multiple diseases.

Last updated June 2016