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Jul 4

Early bird gets the germ: Spring wheat trials at CanolaPALOOZA

Posted on Jul 4 By: Leora Cohen

This year, the Alberta Wheat Commission sponsored and participated in one of the top agronomy events in Alberta, CanolaPALOOZA. Hosted by Alberta Canola, the event was a great success with hundreds of producers and agronomists coming out to chat with industry experts about various agronomic topics.Alberta Wheat team at CanolaPALOOZA along with Dr. Brian Beres

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Jul 4

Crop Report: July 3, 2019

Posted on Jul 4 By: Leora Cohen

Peace Region Moisture levels in the peace region currently range from fair to excellent. Fields are excessively wet in the south of the region, with crops yellowing, and dryer in the north. Cereal crops are around the flag leaf stage, and spraying in the region is nearly wrapped up. There has been the occasional grasshopper

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Jul 3

Alberta Barley says BCC’s new strategic alignment will improve value chain efficiency and benefit farmers

Posted on Jul 3 By: Victoria Decker

Alberta Barley welcomes the strategic realignment of the Barley Council of Canada (BCC) which paves the way for greater collaboration throughout the barley value chain resulting in better service for farmers.  Changes will involve collaboration on delivery of service and sharing of resources with Cereals Canada, the Canadian Malting Barley Technical Centre (CMBTC) and the

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Jun 29

Where does my yield come from?

Posted on Jun 29 By: Jeremy Boychyn

Protect your yield building leaves Not all plant parts are made equal and not all cereal crops build yield with the same leaves. Some leaves carry more value to your yield than others. This can play a huge role in how you manage and control for disease in your wheat or barley crop. When it

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Jun 29

Using the fusarium risk tool

Posted on Jun 29 By: Jeremy Boychyn

If you farm in Alberta, Fusarium graminearum is a yearly concern that can lead to fusarium head blight (FHB) in cereals. Between Fusarium damaged kernels (FDK) and deoxynivalenol (DON), FHB can lead to significant impacts to your crop’s yield, quality and grade. In some cases, it can render your crop unmarketable. Once flag leaf emerges,

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Jun 29

Delayed leaf disease fungicide timing – is it worth it?

Posted on Jun 29 By: Jeremy Boychyn

Cereal leaf disease does not always align with flag leaf fungicide timing. If disease symptoms occur after flag leaf timing, is a later application still worth it? Should I delay the application to head timing (anthesis) to add Fusarium suppression as well or should I apply fungicide now? Would this delay cause yield loss? Research

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Jun 29

Identifying cereal leaf diseases

Posted on Jun 29 By: Jeremy Boychyn

Correctly identifying foliar diseases is important for managing them effectively and efficiently. It is important to take note of moisture conditions, as well as the physical symptoms of the plants, in order to correctly identify diseases. Management practices such as growing resistant varieties, lengthening rotations, using clean and healthy seed, scouting your fields, and being

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Jun 29

Where does stripe rust come from?

Posted on Jun 29 By: Jeremy Boychyn

Fig. 1  Stripe rust, also referred to as yellow rust, is a fungus that can reduce wheat kernel quality and yield and is characterized by raised yellow stripes of spores running along the veins of the leaves (Fig. 1).  Stripe rust spores are around 0.02mm in diameter, making them even smaller than the width of

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Jun 29

Identifying and Managing Stripe Rust

Posted on Jun 29 By: Jeremy Boychyn

Identifying and Managing Stripe Rust Stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis), also known as yellow rust, is a fungus that can have significant impacts on wheat and barley yields.           Fig. 1 It can be identified by elongated yellow-orange oval pustules (uredinia) containing spores (uredospores) that run parallel to the leaf veins in

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Jun 5

Assessing cereal frost damage

Posted on Jun 5 By: Jeremy Boychyn, Research Agronomy Extension Specialist

Areas in central Alberta have been receiving nights below 0°C and the question of crop survival is never far off when this occurs. In general, wheat and barley are relatively resilient to frost as compared to canola. Wheat and barley can survive temperatures down to -6°C especially when soil temperatures are above 10°C and help

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